Dead Biker Riding (Video)

by: MCg

Dead Biker RidingHOW DO YOU, PERSONALLY, DEAL WITH THE RISKS OF MOTORCYCLE RIDING?

Do you think it’s bad karma to talk about motorcycle crashes?

Do you even contemplate the possibility that you might get killed riding?

Or do you simply not think about it at all?

Yes, I have my own opinions on the matter, as you can experience in the video.  But since this isn’t a topic I’ve spoken with many other riders about, I’m more interested in what goes on in your noggin regarding your own while-you’re-riding concept of motorcycle safety.

Please add your feedback below where it says “Leave a Reply” (scroll to the bottom).

 

 

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Comments

212 Responses to “Dead Biker Riding (Video)”
  1. neal says:

    I’m fatalistic in most regards and when it comes to riding, I acknowledge and accept the risks. As my signature on many forums says: “When I was younger I was afraid I’d die riding. Now that I’m old and falling apart, I’m afraid I won’t.”

  2. Jerry says:

    I feel that the list that John Mc gave just about sums
    it up. My first accident I was 24 and the car was at fault.
    damaged my right ankle kept me out of racing (dirt) for a season.
    my mind set then was the next street bike I ride will be
    capable of taking out a Vega (a 70’s Chevy compact).
    Therefore, my next bike was an XS1100. The accident
    didn’t keep me from riding, however the five points were
    etched in my brain.
    Recently, I had an accident which cost me my bike because
    of a momentary laps of concentration. That’s 40 years since
    my last accident. I broke 4 ribs the bike broke the valve cover
    and leaked enough oil to cause a knock in the engine. It reinforced
    the 5 points and absolute vigilance. Am more concerned
    about being incapacitated then dying. Riding a Bike is an assumed
    risk, however,risk can be somewhat mitigated by situational
    awareness, driving with traffic and not antagonizing other drivers
    whose vehicles out weigh you by 4-7times with 4 pads on the
    driving surface. Practice is surely on the top of the list as well as
    bike maintenance. There is a lot more traffic out there since I started
    In the 60’s!
    Just remember, the person who just ran into you or sent you off the
    road doesn’t give a flip about how long you have been riding
    Or how many miles you have under your belt. Just keep
    vigilant.

    Jerry Bloch
    Safety Officer SFRC

  3. vernon says:

    Good reply Ted. I’m pretty much the same mindset I did race flat track and road race 40 yrs.ago. It really develops a great mindset.. 430,000 miles ago…

  4. Ted Donaldson says:

    I agree with “being aware of what’s going on around you always!!”
    I’m 67 years old and have been riding since I was about 18, but have had times without riding. A “positive attitude” is good as long as it gives me confidence to think ahead of a “what if” situation to escape. My mind already automatically programmed to respond instinctively to an unforeseen predicament will most likely save my life or prevent truly a bad scene. I never race so I don’t know if a negative attitude would make me lose a race. All I know is what’s worked for me for all these years for normal enjoyable riding. I glance at the little momento being a small sticker on my windshield. It’s a small but very effective sticker of a skull and cross-bones……it slows me down ever time! I know that that respect for riding on an inherently more dangerous vehicle, is not “programming for failure.” Just the opposite and I don’t believe in fate. Have fun and be safe my forum buddies!

  5. vernon says:

    Anyone that contempletes dying on there cycle is programing a failure. If it’s your time ,so be it .iF EVER A RACER THINKS HE CAN’T WIN,HE NEVER WILL. Keep a positive att. and be aware of whats going on around you, always !!! 55years and 430,000 miles…

  6. shirley say says:

    i was a rider but i fell off my bike my left arm was a little mess up i’m ok but it put fear in me so i’m not riding any more i have that fear i love to ride but just can’t do it any more, i’m a new rider so i have not being riding long, but just can’t do it. i love to see women on there bikes im a woman myself 64 young i’m looking into a trike so this is my comments

  7. Ted Donaldson says:

    This is certainly one of the best comments I’ve read in this forum! You hit the nail on the head! Fellow bikers, old and new! Please heed this very wise advice! Why? We love riding and life!

  8. John Mc says:

    The second year of riding is the most dangerous. The hyper sensitivity of the first year slowly becomes comfort, and speeding and risk taking starts. Half of all motorcycle accidents are solo vehicle accidents. Meaninbg the motorcyclist crashed. Of the other 50%, half are the fault of hte motocyclist. So 25% are pure victims.

    So:
    1. Don’t put yourself in the position.
    2. Leave contingencies.
    3. Awareness and vigilance and anticipation
    – drive like a truck driver (consistent spped and long lead time for maneuvers)
    – play scenarios. Don’t assume how others will act.
    4. All the gear all the time.
    5. Grow older. A sense of pain and mortaility comes with age.

    I’ve always hear that motocyclists fall into two groups:
    those that have been in accidents
    those that will be in accidents

    Act like an accident is trying to sneak upo on you. Ride with the practice of minimizing the opportunities and impact.

  9. Derek says:

    I totally agree with MCg.
    Oblivious is just a fancy word for ‘Unaware’ – and being unaware of likely danger is poor form/reckless in anyone’s book. Good Soapbox job MCg, much appreciated. There’s REAL wisdom from MCg there. As for me, each time before a ride, I contemplate the reality of accidents/death.. I face those questions head on.. My reality is ‘Avoidance/Defensivess/Awareness/Acceptance/Staying Alive to ride Another day.
    Dezza, Australia.

  10. Biker Bob says:

    I have been riding since 1954 and still ride. I don’t feel any less safe on my bike than I do in my automobile, and maybe a little less safe in my automobile because I have better visibility on my bike, plus I can better hear the sounds around me, which sometimes is more important than visibility.

    As with all driving if you don’t keep an eye on the other drivers, and expect them to do something you don’t expect, you better take heed. Most driver are looking for automobiles and they will miss seeing you on a bike, or see you and mistakenly think you are a pedestrian. Thankful running in the day time with our bright lights on has cut them not even seeing us way down from what it use to be, besides there are more bikes on the road today, and driver are more observant of bikes.

    My first and only wreck I have had on a bike other than just dropping it, or when I was racing Motocross, (which by the way will make a much better rider out of anyone) was 4 years after I started riding. A lady ran a stop sign and tee boned me on my 800 pound HD. Thankfully I saw her in time to lift my leg out of the way on that side of the bike, she hit me hard enough to knock the 800 pound bike airborne some 38 feet. The people on the side walk that heard the screeching of tires said I went 15 feet straight up. When I came down she had run under me and I came down in a one point landing with my hip on the left front fender of her car, leaving a big indent in the fender, my arm just below the elbow had taken the hood ornament off her car also. I ended up lengthwise her car on the drivers side, and this lady opened the door, and stepped over me and cried, “Oh, my pretty new car”. Needless to say I jumped up and expressly told her what I thought of her new car, and for her to look at that beautiful bike lying there in a pile. Since then I never enter an intersection without looking both ways, it only takes a glance, a lesson hard earned.

  11. Matthew says:

    Greetings to the the brotherhood of biking brothers! I’ve been biking since ’78 and riding has become challenging in the city because of other users. I’ve fallen thrice (that’s deeply edge in my mind) in all these years of riding but come away unscathed thanks to protective gear from head to toe. I’ve lost friends also b’cos of their cavalier attitudes. I ride as if I’m invisible to other road users including pedestrians and avoid riding at night (especially out in the country). I’m in Singapore now and if you ride here, you need to be ultra-defensive! Because the people pay so much for their cars and bikes, everybody (nearly) think they own the road! In SE Asia or Asia, you need to be really vigilant when you’re riding! Partly, they seem to care little for their lives or of others using the roads! Ride safe! Ride to live and enjoy another biking day! Stay cool and Blessed Christmas to all and a Happy 2015 riding. RIDE SAFE, BROTHERS AND SISTER OUT THERE!

  12. Matthew says:

    Greetings to the the brotherhood of biking brothers! I’ve been biking since ’78 and riding has become challenging in the city because of other users. I’ve fallen thrice (that’s deeply edge in my mind) in all these years of riding but come away inscathed thanks to protective gear from head to toe. I’ve lost friends also b’cos of their cavalier attitudes. I ride as if I’m invisible to other road users including pedestrians and avoid riding at night (especially out in the country). I’m in Singapore now and if you ride here, you need to be ultra-defensive! Because the people pay so much for their cars and bikes, everybody (nearly) think they own the road! In SE Asia or Asia, you need to be really vigilant when you’re riding! Partly, they seem to care little for their lives or of others using the roads! Ride safe! Ride to live and enjoy another biking day! Stay cool and Blessed Christmas to all and a Happy 2015 riding. RIDE SAFE, BROTHERS AND SISTER OUT THERE!

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